Creativity differs according to each individual.
Either way, how we express ourselves can be scary at times. No matter how creative we can get, there will always be jabs at us.
Some people find this overwhelming, and choose to conform their creativity to acceptable levels. Others go the opposite direction: they strive to improve their craft.
This post is about the latter, and how a movie reminds us of just how creative we can truly be. That is, creativity through other people.

The artist’s job is not to succumb to despair but to find an antidote for the emptiness of existence. -Gertrude Stein

The concept of expression is a strange one. It differs with each individual.
We are free to do whatever we want.
Write what we want, dance, play: live a life however we want.
While some may be able to express themselves better through painting, others express themselves better on the rugby field, speaking on stage, or performing complex calculations for experiments.
All of these are expressions of the inner character: We share what we are most passionate about through expression.
But, were we taught to express ourselves? Do we have the freedom to do this around the world?
It is fun to express: we learn as we grow older that we have this need to do so.
We want to prove that we are the best artists. We want to shout that we are the best in our fields: Talking with the right people, by expressing humility and grace. Showing we want to learn more, by expressing a willingness to be a student of life.
How was it taught in education?

I was afraid to share my secrets.
Here we are at the usual coffee shop near Town Hall, and my friend asks me.
“Could you tell me what’s wrong?”
I couldn’t. I didn’t want to be seen as weak.
I bottle my problems up so that I don’t bother others. Yet, I felt his sympathy.
“Well…”

15 minutes of silence after, I told him.
I didn’t want him to know, but I was at a loss. No one was there to help me. I couldn’t make sense of the thoughts in my head. I didn’t want my best friend to see me in such a poor state.
Have you ever had a time when you were uncomfortable with sharing something due to who you are?
It could be this notion I have in my head. Whatever my problems were, it doesn’t seem right to share. He might be uncomfortable hearing about it. He may judge me.
He won’t. He’s my friend. I know him that well.
Yet, I felt unattracted to the idea. I am at my ugliest when I’m most vulnerable.
When I realized that, I started crying. He already had his hand on my shoulder.
He knew I was suffering. We all need help sometimes.

Let’s discuss polymaths: namely, the lifelong battle between Generalists and Specialists.

It’s kind of difficult to explain what a polymath is without seeing just how capable a polymath could be in the modern world. But, we’re going to try it anyway.

On one hand, a specialist is easier to determine: When in their element, specialists thrive on their deep understanding of a certain field. If you are in need of an expert, look no further than a specialist in that field.
In contrast, a polymath is known as an expert-generalist: A jack of all trades, a master of none. As one, I can dive into a field of my interest, read up about it, hold a proper justified opinion on said field, and create value from there.
Note that it becomes harder for me to create greater specific value than say, a specialist, aka. someone with decades of experience down the line.
But, having the tendencies of a polymath compared to others holds a few advantages that no other can provide.
For example:

Why do humans have selfless tendencies?

In the world of charities, social enterprises and philanthropy, this is one element of human character that must not be disregarded when helping out others. Born out of empathy, selflessness allows us to justify helping others over ourselves, however natural our instinct to survive is.

But, beyond selflessness, what is it that motivates people to do such things? Benefitting humanity, doing acts for others?

Here are some of my takes:

When we think of the Japanese, we think of beauty. Though the standards are different, the meaning of beauty had always been etched deep into its culture for a very long time.
As I thought of this, I had the chance to answer a question on Quora that may find value in some of my observations and research. This all came from back when I was living there in 2015.
The question was:

Do Japanese people, in general, find their own kind more attractive than Western people?

Here’s my answer.